When You’re Not Feeling CrossFit…

 

Yesterday, I had a CrossFit competition that was local. I was just not feeling it. I skipped the floater because I’m battling injuries already and truly don’t think I can handle any more. The floater was with heavy weight. And then, in the only CrossFit WOD I had fun in, I ripped my hand, which always sucks. God, I hate kipping. Every time I kip chest-to-bar pull-ups, this crap happens.

Needless to say, I should have skipped this one altogether.

CrossFit: Tips for Dealing with Hand Rips

If you CrossFit for any period of time, you’ll know how hard CrossFit is on your hands, from constantly being dried out with chalk to the bars tearing into you and the motion of pull ups on the rig. You are bound to rip at some point in your CrossFit workouts.

Hand Care 102: Treating Rips - Fitness, crossfit, injury prevention, Gymnastics, hand careTIPS FOR HELPING YOUR HANDS HEAL FROM RIPS

  • Once you rip, immediately wash with water, apply a disinfectant, and bandage up. You’ll want to cut any loose skin away from the wounds to help with healing.
  • Wait a few hours and then remove bandages. There are two schools of thought here: either keep the wounds moist to facilitate healing or dry out the wound to let it heal. I always let mine dry out.
  • Be extremely careful for the next few days. Depending on the severity of the rips, try not to do too much with your hands.
  • Showering will be painful, but it’s good to rinse your wounds and keep them clean. You may want to skip shampooing for a few days.
  • Tape up when you decide to work out again. This will protect the wounds from infection but mainly from being damaged any further.
  • Avoid the rig, ring work, handstands, pull ups, rope climbs, or any other movement that will further cause damage until your hands are completely healed up. Barbells and dumbbells are usually okay as long as you’re taped up.
  • Let time do it’s thing. Your hands heal really quickly so in a week or so, you’ll be back at your regular CrossFit workouts.

Ripping is never fun, but it’s usually inevitable if you end up doing CrossFit workouts with high rep counts of pull ups or chest to bar or muscle ups. For me, I have been doing strict only. This eliminates the back and forth motion that causes rips. However, when it’s the CrossFit Open or any other kind of competition, I kip because I’m competing. That is why I ripped.

Keep these tips in mind, and get back at it!

CrossFit: #EarnIt

hot crossfit chicks doing Tuff Love 2019 CrossFit Competition in Boulder
Tuff Love 2019 CrossFit Competition

As I’m sitting around my house today letting my body heal my hands since I can’t do much physically after ripping on 19.5, I realized something: I earned it.

I was wearing Bergeron’s Master’s tank top with the hashtag #EarnIt on the back while doing CrossFit Open Workout 19.5 and realized something: I definitely earned it this go-around. I ripped early on and kept going. I kept ripping and kept going. I almost finished but got time-capped.

You don’t have to rip in order to earn it (in fact, I’d recommend NOT choosing this way), but when you CrossFit regularly, many times you feel as if you’re not earning it. In fact, all you feel is tired, sore, and mentally worn out — and you’re left wondering why am I even doing this.

The fact of the matter is if you CrossFit, you earn it with every single workout, every single day — even if you don’t feel it. You earn it when you show up at 5 am for an early morning workout or drag yourself after work when all you want to do is go and sit. You earn it when a CrossFit Hero Workout makes you so sore you can’t squat to do laundry, or when you go all-out on Fran to set a new PR. You earn it when you do strength work that is mind-numbingly boring (for me, this is deadlifts), or when you practice hollow holds over and over again because your kip sucks and it needs to get better.

What does Earn It mean? For me, it’s always me against myself. What can I do better? What can I do today I couldn’t do yesterday? And how do I feel when I beat my expectations and do things other wouldn’t?

What does Earn It mean for you?

CrossFit Open Workout 19.5 Ends the CrossFit Open — And I Couldn’t Be Happier

I like the CrossFit Open, but let’s face it, five weeks of workouts meant to test your skills and where each workout is a competition (with yourself if no one else) is challenging. It disrupts training, alters your routine, and keeps you stressed out on Thursday night until you finish the workout.

CrossFit Open Workout 19.5 was as predicted:

hot crossfit mom doing CrossFit Open Workout 19.5 Chest to bar pull ups in Colorado
CrossFit Open Workout 19.5 Chest to bar pull ups

33-27-21-15-9 of:

  • Thrusters 65 lbs
  • Chest to bar pull ups

Because this was the Open, I kipped the chest to bar pull ups because it’s faster for me and because my strict chest to bar pull ups go relatively quickly. This was a mistake since I ended up tearing in 4 places, making the workout miserable for me. I had to stop and grab hand guards and it was overall dumb after that.

I haven’t torn in a year because I don’t normally kip anything for that very reason. Needless to say, I’m not exactly thrilled about the upcoming week, having to limit my workouts until my hands heal. Plus, I’m already dealing with a calf strain, so this week overall will suck.

I’m glad the CrossFit Open is over, so things can return to normal — as normal as a CrossFit life can get.

Things I Wish I Would Have Known Before I Started CrossFit…

orig_3365eda27d54b0198fd2b4f1d6a66b90a970ac6b1)  Olympic Weightlifting.  Most boxes do a poor job in teaching their members Olympic Weightlifting.  It wasn’t until I took the Olympic Weightlifting Level 1 Certification that I realized how ignorant I was.  Find a reputable coach and learn from the best in your area.

2)  You REALLY do need shoulder strength to kip and to prevent injuries.  I wish someone would have warned me how horrible kipping is for your shoulders and arms.  I wish my coaches would have prevented me from doing kipping pull ups until I could do strict pull ups.  I wish someone would have warned me doing 100 pull ups and negatives were a bad idea the second month of CrossFit.  Finally, after 2 years, I feel strong enough.

3)  CrossFit will trump many other things in your life if it becomes your passion.  I live for CrossFit.  I put CrossFit above many other important things in my life (like sleep for example) because it is an addiction.  A healthy one, but one I recognize nonetheless lest it turn unhealthy.  A fine line to walk!

4)  You’re devoted to your box because of the people, not the workouts.  Some of my closest friends I met at my box and I get to see everyday.  I’ve thought of going elsewhere to other boxes, but at the end of the day it’s the friendships that keep you going!

5)  Rest days are harder than work days.  I live for the box and when I’m on a rest day, it takes all of my might to resist going (especially if the workout is one want to do).  Stick to the plan.  It works.

6)  Eating right is a daily struggle.  Since I have kids having junk food lying around is a given.  Will power takes on new meaning when you’re eating for performance.  Again, stick to the plan, the diet, the nutrition.  It works.  When you deviate, you’ll pay in unwanted weight gain and in stomach cramps!

7)  Ripping is a part of CrossFit that never goes away.  You can shave your callouses all you want, you’ll still rip on workouts such as Murph or Angie.  Do your utmost to prevent it but it’s as much a part of CrossFit as PR’s.

8)  Muscle soreness is perpetual.  It never goes away.  Neither does having something tweaked.  It’s a part of CrossFit I think that drives many to quit after 6 months.  You either accept it or you don’t.

9)  Your body will change.  And drastically.  I never thought I’d have “the CrossFit look” but one look at me and you’ll know.  And I keep getting stronger and leaner and bigger.  If you push yourself, this is inevitable.

10)  Your self-confidence in yourself will grow and you will bloom when you never, ever thought you would.  I can do things most women can’t physically.  I work hard.  I train hard.  And my mind has worked just as hard and harder.  I have grown as a person not just as an athlete.  You will discover that anything in life truly is possible.  You will find your life’s passion.  You will succeed at anything you do.  That’s a promise.  That’s CrossFit.

The Perpetual, Horrendous Condition of CrossFit Hands…

I ripped again on Saturday.

I did GI Jane (100 burpee pull-ups) and was wearing brand-new grips.  Not a good idea.

I was showing my sister-in-law my hands later that day, and for the first time in a long time I really looked at my hands.

I have callouses under every finger.  I have callouses on my fingers.shutterstock_10911802

Where I’ve ripped previously on my palms the skin is a different shade of pink.

My thumbs are discolored I presume from the constant turning over of the bar due to Olympic lifts.

I have an interesting curve mark in-between my thumb and first finger on my palm that I presume is from the bar as well.

My hands definitely wouldn’t win any beauty contests.

She thought they were gross.

To me, it’s something I don’t even think about.  It’s a part of CrossFit I’ve accepted like bruises and soreness.

Later, I wondered if this is one of the reasons there are more men than women who do CrossFit.

I know of one woman who quit doing CrossFit because she doesn’t like the look of her body (all muscular).

Women care more about these things.

Men like soft hands I think.  And with CrossFit they are far from soft.  The exact opposite.

What are your thoughts?  Ladies?  Do you like the look of your body from CrossFit? What about your hands?  Is that a concern?