CrossFit: Don’t Let the Clock Rule

In our last blog post, we talked about ignoring time caps so you can get to the part of the workout you want — the heavier weight part.

In this blog post, we’ll discuss how and why you should not let the clock rule.

BEATING THE CLOCK IN CROSSFIT

Many people get caught up on time in CrossFit. Many CrossFit gyms do as well. You’re always pushing yourself to “beat the clock.” But why?

One reason is because you’ll work harder and get more interval type training when you race the clock down. And there is a time and place of this. However, there also is a time when you ignore the clock and do your own thing.

When you’re not worried about the clock, you go at your own pace. You do the work how you want to do the work. You don’t care how long it takes as long as it gets done. You take short breaks when you need to. You go until you finish.

For me, this is how I work out most of the time. I go at my own pace. I break when I need to break. I don’t stop because it’s been 20 minutes. I go until my body says it’s time to quit. I don’t care what the clock says.

If I want to push myself, I’ll attend a CrossFit class. But mainly I push myself in CrossFit competitions or the CrossFit Open. That’s about it.

I think more people would try CrossFit and do CrossFit if they didn’t have some kind of standard to live up to, say doing 5 rounds in 10 minutes.

Try working out without worrying about the clock. See if you’re more motivated.

CrossFit: If You Want to Get Stronger, Eliminate Time Caps

I remember a few years ago when I first started CrossFit that I would get frustrated when I got time capped. Some CrossFit boxes are particular about this and become upset if you keep working out after time is called. That would just annoy me.

CrossFit and Time Caps

Being time capped in a CrossFit WOD was particularly irksome when it was one that climbed in weight, and I wouldn’t get a chance to try the heavier weight.

Today was one of those CrossFit workouts where the weight climbed, but today (like most of my workouts), I ignored the time cap. I got to do the heavier weight (in today’s example, it was thrusters), and I got to do a bunch of them.

Then I realized something: I’ve gotten stronger since last year because I’ve done heavier weights more frequently because I never time cap myself. I just do the workout until it’s done or keep going because I like the challenge and the rush.

It’s a shame CrossFit classes have to time cap because of the limited time they have. Try to workout more by yourself with no time cap, and you’ll see results, guaranteed.

When a CrossFit Hero Workout Hits the Spot

I was on vacation this weekend and CrossFit Open workout 19.2 wasn’t really a workout when I didn’t make it past the first round, so I was itching for something long and hard. Enter Andy, a CrossFit Hero workout, named for U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Andrew T. Weathers who died Sept. 30, 2014.

Weathers was wounded Sept. 28 in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, when he heroically ran to a rooftop through hundreds of incoming rounds to repel an attack of insurgents who were attempting to overrun his position. His actions saved the lives of five U.S. Green Berets and nine Afghan Commandos at his location. Weathers was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 7th Special Forces Group, at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida.

 

His CrossFit Hero workout is:

  • 25 thrusters
  • 50 box jumps
  • 75 deadlifts
  • 1.5 mile run
  • 75 deadlifts
  • 50 box jumps
  • 25 thrusters

80 pounds on the bar for women and wearing a weight vest (14 lb for women).

I did really well at this workout. I came in way under the 1 hour I thought it would take me, and it was fun. It was just what I needed on this negative degree morning in Colorado. It gave me motivation and encouragement because when I woke up I didn’t want to do it. Long workouts are one of my strengths, and I sweated and this CrossFit Hero WOD was hard. and it was awesome.

I love CrossFit.

Mental Break in CrossFit Hero’s WOD Bradley

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Bradley R. Smith, 24, of Troy, Illinois, was killed on January 3, 2010, by an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan.

His CrossFit Hero WOD is:

10 rounds for time of:

  • Sprint 100 meters
  • 10 Pull-ups
  • Sprint 100 meters
  • 10 Burpees
  • Rest 30 seconds

There’s nothing quite like CrossFit body weight workouts. They don’t require as much concentration as workouts with a barbell or even dumbbells. They are usually just mindless grinder once you get going.

Which was the CrossFit workout I needed this day.

Uneven Load Training: Underestimating Sandbag Sit-ups

CrossFit Babe doing wall balls in CrossFit Open 19.1
Perfect Wall Ball position in CrossFit

Today was a sandbag workout.

I decided to sub 30 v-ups for 30 sandbag sit-ups, mainly because I like sandbag sit ups.

Well, this was a mistake.

They were a lot harder than I thought and 30 of them about killed me. But it was good.

Lesson learned: subbing sandbags for other movements may not be such a good idea after all.

The After Effects of CrossFit Hero WOD Chad Wilkinson

namesake photoChad Wilkinson died in October by suicide after 22 years serving our country. A new CrossFit Hero WOD has been created, honoring him. The CrossFit workout is 1000 step ups wearing a ruck sack for time. As you may recall, I did this on Friday.

It is now 48 hours later, and I’m still suffering the consequences. Yesterday, I didn’t think it was too bad — just a slight ache in my calves. Today, my calves are both sore, putting a hitch in my step. As I’m on vacation, I can’t put anything on them, so here I am, suffering.

During the CrossFit Hero WOD, I kept telling myself, “I’m never doing this one again.” Afterwards, I told myself, “I could do that again.” Now, I’m unsure. We’ll see how long the pain lasts on this one.

CrossFit: Doing Things Others Won’t Smartly

This morning I did a new CrossFit Hero Workout called Chad Wilkinson. Honoring Chad

hot crossfit chicks doing step ups
Box Step Ups CrossFit

Wilkinson who died in October by suicide after 22 years serving our country, this Hero WOD is 1000 step ups wearing a ruck sack.

For me, the plan was to do 500. I kept going after 500 but stopped at 740 because my knee began to hurt. I had planned to do the 1000, but I listened to my body instead.

Our bodies are amazing and will do amazing things. At the same time, we have to care for our bodies, and we are called to honor our bodies (1 Corinthians 6:19-20).

I currently am battling a strain in my right arm, and I don’t need a knee injury right now.

Oh, how I’ve changed. One year ago, I would have pushed through to finish that, no matter the cost. Now, as I’m older (and wiser), I know it’s just not worth it.

I love doing things others won’t do; yet, now, I’m doing them smartly.

Tips to Know When to Quit

  • When something begins to hurt
  • When something feels off
  • When your mind is not focused, and you’re putting yourself at an increased risk for injury
  • When your gut tells you so
  • When you’re mentally done