We’re All a Work In Progress…

“Just a warning my rig work is rough.  Pull ups and Toes to Bar.  Barbell I am decent but still only a couple of years in.  Mostly doing comp for fun and friends are doing as well.”

This was a text I got from the guy I’m gonna partner with in an upcoming CrossFit competition in May.  Here’s my response:

“No problem.  We’re all a work in progress.  I don’t have ring muscle ups yet.  They are coming along.  And going heavy is touch and go cause of how lean I am. We’ll hopefully have enough between us to give it a go!!”

Last night, I had ice cream, brownies, Bailey’s and Kahlua.  I indulged big time.  It was so good!

In the morning I felt bloated due to the extra water carbs cause your body to hold.

I told myself, “It’s alright, Jen.  You’re a work in progress.”

This holds true for all aspects of your life.

Parenting.  You’re doing the best you can.

Eating, dieting, nutrition.  You’re doing the best you can.

Exercise and fitness.  You’re doing the best you can.

Work and career.  You’re doing the best you can.

Hobbies, religion, family, obligations, giving, helping others, voting, being a member of society, pets, animals, this planet, life.

You’re doing the best you can.

Give yourself a break.

You’re human.  You have strengths and weaknesses.  You succeed.  You fail.

But there’s always tomorrow.  Or this moment.  To start over.  To begin again.  To do better.  Be better.  Live better.

Here’s to you:  a work in progress.  Not yet complete.  But with each stroke more and more beautiful!

Related image

 

Why Are Stares Bothering Me NOW?

A few days ago, one of my friends proceeded to tell me that CrossFitters don’t look much different than others.  This was based off the conversation that women don’t want to get big shoulders from doing CrossFit.

Well, I piped in.  “Based off of my experience and comments made to me, I would highly disagree.”

I’m beginning to take more notice of people as well–mainly because I’m getting more stares than usual.

There aren’t that many people walking around who look like me.Image result for animals staring

This has been affirmed lately as I’ve been dressing up more than usual as the weather turns warmer and wearing more clothes that show my muscles.

I was having a different conversation, explaining my routine to two gals I just met, and I  realized something:  not many people lead the life I do or do what I do.  The hours I spend that have given me this body I now inhabit are not how others spend their hours.  The extra time I put in toward my goals.  The work involved.  The sacrifices (I’m thinking of chocolate cake right now…)

And that’s not just CrossFit.

I blog.  A lot.

I work.  A lot.

I read.  A lot.

I’m constantly striving to be a better person, a better wife, a better mother, a better human being despite all my flaws.  I’m constantly searching for what’s out there for me, what I’m supposed to be doing, what path is next.  And I’m constantly learning.  I despise sitting and boredom and monotony.  Contentment is elusive.  Accepting that this is all there is is not an option….

Which begs the question:  What’s next?

 

Where Do CrossFitters Fit In?

Image result for fitting inThis thought came to mind as I was re-canting a recent job interview.  It was with a very well known national company that embraced the “come as you are” theme.  So I thought, “Perfect!  I’ll fit in great here!”

But as I met the gals in my prospective department it became abundantly clear I would not.  On the tour of the facility, no one else looked like me.  I get it, I do.  Not a lot of people do.  And because of the sport I choose to do, I eat differently, live differently, do things differently.

Still…

It begged the question above:  Just where do CrossFitters Fit in?

I don’t have an answer to that (so leave a comment if you do!).  I’m still trying to figure it out myself.

I think that’s why I’m still searching in life.  How am I supposed to spend my time and what am I supposed to be doing with the time I have left?

Being Healthy is Hard Work…

I now realize why a lot of people fail diets, exercise, New Year’s Resolutions, and any other challenge they face.

Because it’s hard work.

I keep a journal of what went well on that day, areas I can grow, and what I learned and this is what I learned yesterday.

I ate really well yesterday until dinner time.  My husband cooked a really good dinner and I ate too much.  But it was really good!  Grilled chicken, sweet potatoes, garlic bread, and broccoli and cauliflower.

Today is a new day.Image result for failure

I get to start over!

Could you imagine if we didn’t have days and nights and we’d be stuck on the same day (If you lived on Venus, the day would last 5, 832 hours!  That’s 243 Earth days!).

This is like everything in life.

If you fail (as we all do every day of our lives), you get to start over!  Quite frequently in fact.

Try this next time you fail at a meal:  start over on the next meal.  It’s another opportunity to get it right.  And if we get it right 80% of the time, we’ll still meet our goals. Don’t get frustrated and throw in the towel and proclaim, “Well, that didn’t work!”  One step at a time.  Always.

Try this with anything in life.

Failing is ok.

Quitting is not ok.

Learn from your mistakes and attack the next time with a vengeance!

Happy learning!!

 

My Blessed Life…

Image result for i crossfit nap coffee
This says it all.

The above image says it all:  I love coffee.  I CrossFit.  I take naps.

I really have nothing to complain about in this world and about my life.

My husband works hard and pays the bills.

I work to pay for my CrossFit and kids’ activities.

I have the freedom to do what I want when I want (for the most part) since my job is mostly online.

If I want to go for a run, I do.

If I want to go for coffee, I do.

If I need to eat, I eat.  If I need a break, I do laundry.  If I want to read a book, I do.

I’m free to pick up the kids and run them wherever they need to be.

Occasionally, I do get a nap.

And I have God.

I lead a great life.

Sure, we could have more money in the bank.  More money for retirement.  I could have more of an idea how I want to spend the next 20 years.  I could have a cleaner house (I spend too much time CrossFitting it seems).  I could be earning more money since I have a master’s degree in Finance.

But I chose not to work on the weekends.  Not to put my kids in daycare when they were babies and work a full-time job.  Not to follow the crowd.

So I have no complaints.

Really.

None of us do if we live in the developed world.  In the modern world really (toilets, anyone?)

Life is good, and I just need to remember that when the stupid little things in life threaten to change my mindset.

Life is good, life is good, life is good….

How to Be Content In Your Own Skin…

Some days it’s hard to be sore.

Hard to do every day tasks like laundry and dishes when you have to squat and all your legs want to do is shout at you.

Every day activities most do with ease become a challenge when you CrossFit as much as I do.

Yet, I’d have it no other way.

We are all products of our lifestyle whether we know it or not.

A friend of mine is overweight.  She’s been 100 lbs overweight for over 10 years now.  She keeps hopping from diet to diet, exclaiming how “this one is better” and “this one will work.”

I’ve told her my philosophy and all I’ve read about the Zone Diet and Mindless Eating.  It goes in one ear and out the other.

Another friend of mine bemoans how she can’t lose 10 lbs.  Yet her Facebook page is always covered with her out with her friends, drinking mimosas and eating probably more than is recommended.  She works out, but hasn’t changed.

Same thing with her.

CrossFit MOB 2
Wallball Fun!

My mom starves herself.  Literally.  She is one fall away from death.  She can’t remember things because she doesn’t feed her brain.  She smokes and has horrible migraines.  In her mind though she’s healthy.

I can preach all I want, but you have to listen and want to change your lifestyle.

Then I think People can say the same thing about me.  Complaining how I work out too much and I can’t move because I did 300 squats, etc.

Ultimately, it’s your life.  You only have one to live.  Be happy and content with it.

I know this is hard as I’m still trying to find my sweet spot to have the abs I want yet be healthy and happy and still enjoy all the richness God has blessed me with.

We (especially us women) beat ourselves up so much over looks and in the end we’re all the same.  We all age.  We all go through the same processes if you’re a mother in terms of bodily changes.

We all face challenges.  It’s how you respond to the challenges that determines your mindset.

If it’s truly important, you’ll change.  If it’s not and you’re happy with where you’re at, then BE HAPPY!  Quit comparing yourself to others and be content with who you are.

If you’re not content, then change it.

Life is what you make it.  If you want to starve, then do it.  If you want to enjoy your friends and go out all the time, do it.  If you want to kill yourself with workouts, do it.

It’s your life, your body, your choice.  Don’t let others shame you.  Don’t feel bad about it.  Embrace it.

Or change it.

It’s your choice….

Now live with it…

Mindless Eating

Image result for mindless eatingMindless Eating by Brian Wansink is a book that explores “why we eat more than we think.”

Wansink’s book explores the tricks marketers use to get us to buy their products and how our minds play tricks on us as well to justify our eating habits.  He asserts (correctly) that we’ll never be able to lose weight based off of will power alone if we deprive ourselves of our favorite foods.

Habits are the key.  We do eat out of habit (mindless as Wansink calls it) and subconsciously for various reasons.  Some are from our childhoods.  Others are from watching others’ patterns.  But most are not for sustenance.  Wansink’s research shows we eat from habits, some formed since childhood, and without thinking.  This leads to weight gain over time.

His solution:  Cut 100-300 calories a day in 3 simple changes you commit to that will cause a weight lose over a year of 10-20 pounds that are mindless.  You do this by food trade-offs and food policies, both of which give you the chance to eat some of what you want.  Other recommended tricks:  buy smaller plates, which tricks the mind into thinking we are eating more than we actually are, don’t eat out of the package or standing in front of the TV, don’t put food on the table while eating–make it inconvenient to get up to get seconds, don’t eat in front of the TV, and beware of “low-fat” alternatives that trick us into eating more.

We make over 200 food choices a day (from what to eat to walking by the candy dish).  We don’t have the mental will power to resist all the “no’s” caused by these 200 decisions every day.

Thus:  change your environment.  Out of sight, out of mind works.  Get rid of the food on your counters and put the “bad” food or high-calories foods in the back.  Make it harder to get to these.  Make it easy to grab celery and carrots.  No see through containers either.  The more inconvenient good is, the less likely we will consume it.

This is doable for most people.  Most people won’t go exercise more.  But they will not eat that slice of cheesecake if it’s on your “no food” policy list.  Accountability is you checking this off on a calendar at the end of the day if you followed your simple 3 rules.

I love this idea because for me 100-200 calories is easy to do.  And Wansink says your body won’t miss the calories like it would if you were trimming 500 or more calories per day.  Hence, your adherence will be much higher.

My 3 changes are:

  1. Either cut the sugar I put in my coffee by half or use a sugar-free alternative.
  2. Don’t buy icing (my one weakness I can’t resist when it’s in the house).
  3. Don’t eat past 6 pm at night.

Overall great read on how our minds work around food and the tricks marketers use to get us to buy their products over their competitors.  I love the premise of small changes leading to big results.  Highly recommended for those who find diets and exercise challenging.  This is a way to start small and go from there!