CrossFit Competition for Teens Denver

CrossFit: Why Your CrossFit Teen Program is NOT Growing…

Teenagers are a fickle bunch. They really don’t want to do anything unless it’s what they want to do (which is hang out with their friends and sit around all day long, watching Netflix, playing video games, or just reading a good book in bed). They are at that awkward age where they are trying to figure out themselves, what they want to do in this world, and why they exist. Heavy questions for only having on average about 15 years of experience.

CROSSFIT AND TEENS

Enter CrossFit. CrossFit began as a way to get in shape. Period. It would have been cool I think to have been there at its inception or to have participated in the first CrossFit Games where it was nothing but pure fun and a good time.

Fast-forward a decade, and CrossFit is a serious sport with professional athletes. While this is fun to watch, the vast majority of CrossFitters will never be at that level — and most don’t want to be.

However, the problem arises when this mentality of being the best, pushing yourself, and actually caring about WODs is thrusted upon teens, who, honestly, could give a shit most of the time. Granted, there are those serious about it; but, to be truthful, they have time, and most of them know that.

THE LOCAL CROSSFIT COMPETITION SCENE

I enter CrossFit competitions because they are fun. That is it. If I win, great. If I come in last place, great (I must admit, there have been CrossFit competitions where I have secretly hoped to come in last place so I could leave early).

As a parent, I want to share this with my daughter, who likes CrossFit, but at this point, just does it for fun (and to spend time with me, but she’d never admit that).

As someone who can never find a partner for whatever reason, she and I have become partners in several CrossFit competitions. We usually enter scaled so she can do the movements. In one that is coming up, we have entered Open, mainly because I thought this CrossFit competition had a scaled division (just found out it does not).

In local CrossFit competitions, the WOD’s are released as the CrossFit competition nears. This gives the die-hards time to practice (I never do cause I don’t give a shit), and it gives those who are on the fence about signing up an opportunity to decide.

Back to the whole point of this article: so this local competition is not programmed at all for teens. In fact, I will be doing the majority of the work. This is incredibly frustrating: 1) I would like to be able to walk the next day 2) my daughter does not get to experience the whole experience of the CrossFit competition when I’m doing the vast majority of the work. Plus, this is no fun for either of us.

PROGRAM CROSSFIT COMPETITIONS FOR TEENS!

But the real point of this CrossFit rant is that no CrossFit competition is programmed for teens (even when it’s a teen CrossFit competition). It’s programmed for 17 & 18 years olds who are a world away from 13, 14 & 15-year olds. As a parent, this is beyond frustrating. In fact, I’ve had several words with several CrossFit competitions (who all probably hate me, too) about this very fact. If you’re not even using CrossFit Open teen standards to program for teens, then there’s a problem.

I believe firmly this is why CrossFit teens programs at local CrossFit boxes remain stagnant. You cannot coach or program teens like you do adults. The focus needs to be in just getting teens to the gym, working out, and going home feeling like they did something. The passion will come later when they actually care.

My fight will continue as I am utterly incapable of not voicing my opinion. My prayer is that CrossFit does wise up, return to its roots, and just get teens moving (this is good advice for adults, too).

And programming a CrossFit competition with teens in mind would be nice. But so many CrossFit boxes are afraid if they don’t put on a good comp, no one will come back. I believe the opposite is true. When a CrossFit competition is all-inclusive, your CrossFit competition will grow (as will your membership). Contact me today!

hot crossfit chick crossfit sanitas crossfit competition

Crossfit: I Am Back…

I’ve taken an unintended break, mainly because I was so angry about my body.

Not necessarily how it looks (although I’m not happy with it).

More I’m angry at having been injured all year long. So I couldn’t stand to write about CrossFit because I was so angry.

The 2020 CrossFit Open came and went. I actually did quite well, considering I was injured. To be truthful, I hated every moment of every workout.

However, I couldn’t take it anymore, so I finally went back to my doctor, who gave me the all clear again to begin working out.

CrossFit Goals

So, I’m back.

A heavy weight has been lifted off my shoulders, and I’m ready to begin again. Next week, I’ll start a new program to reach my CrossFit goals for the year:

  1. Ring muscle up in the next six months
  2. Bar muscle ups fixed in the six months after that
  3. Get stronger in back squat
  4. Get stronger in deadlift
  5. Perfect handstand walks

These are my main CrossFit goals. I have others, but these are first. In essence, I don’t want another CrossFit Open to roll my way without having these skills in my wheelhouse.

CrossFit Hero Wods: 31 Heroes

31 Heroes CrossFit WOD honors the 31 military heroes who died Aug 6th, 2011 in Afghanistan.

The CrossFit workout is:

AMRAP 31:

  • 8 thrusters 105 lbs
  • 6 rope climbs
  • 11 box jumps 24 inches

With a partner. One partner works while the other does a 400 m sandbag run of 35 lbs. Then you switch.

This is a fundraiser to help the families of the fallen heroes and many others. 31 Heroes was fun but hard. The run was harder than I thought it would be. Thrusters weren’t bad although I re-injured my thumb on them. Great cause so donate now!

CrossFit: I’m About to Throw in the Towel

Two days ago, I did a CrossFit Hero Workout called Coe, a seemingly simple CrossFit WOD from looking at it:

Ten rounds of

  • 10 thrusters at 65 lbs for women (95 for men)
  • 10 ring push-ups

I finished in under 20 minutes, which is short for a CrossFit Hero Workout and didn’t think much about it — until the next day when every time I went to lift my arms over my head, it hurt.

That same day, I decided to do Flight Simulator, a Crossfit Notable workout that involves jumping a bazillion double unders. I didn’t think much about this either — until the next day and my right calf was seized up again.

Incredibly, this didn’t bother me. What bothered me was the next day when my shoulders were still sore and my right calf was even worse. It was at this moment I got completely fed up.

I can’t run. I can’t jump. And I can’t do a bazillion reps without thinking about it first. This is what is bothering me. Everything I do from now on has to be strategically planned. God, this sucks.

hot crossfit chick running in crossfit competition in co springs

CrossFit: There is Only So Much I Can Mentally Do

More frequently than not, I wake up in the morning and scrap my CrossFit programming in light of something completely different. This is for two reasons:

  1. I am incredibly sore from the day before.
  2. I cannot do the workout for mental purposes.

With two CrossFit competitions in the last two weeks, I’ve had both of these reasons come into play several times. I’ve had to adjust my schedule every day for the last two weeks, and take unplanned rest days because I just couldn’t do it anymore.

Today was another example. I had a CrossFit Hero workout planned, which are CrossFit workouts named after service men and women and are known for being tough. However, when I woke up, I just couldn’t run. I had done a HIIT workout yesterday and ran over 3 miles. Hence, while doing the workout, I changed it.

While I freely admit I don’t know how to stop doing what I do, I do know when to stop doing a movement when I can’t. Today was one of those days. I stopped running and rowed instead. I cut all my reps in half. I did a 30 minute recovery workout.

HOW TO PRESERVE THE MENTAL GAME

In the past few months, I’ve learned the mental game of CrossFit is much more important to master than the physicalness of it. Don’t get me wrong, you have to be able to physically do the moves; but that’s not the hard part of CrossFit. The hard part is committing in your mind to do the CrossFit workout.

TIPS ON MASTERING THE MENTAL GAME

  • I’ve learned you can’t go hard core every day. You have to rest your mind as much as you rest your body. Sometimes you just have to get up and perform some mindless rowing so the next day you can hit it hard.
  • You have to preserve your sanity. CrossFit burnout is real; it hits me every few months. You have to pull back in order to move forward.
  • Do what you need to do when you need to do it. The beauty of at-workouts is you can do what you want, not what someone else programs. It’s the ultimate in listening to your body.

CrossFit: Knowing When to Take a Mental Break from CrossFit

hot crossfit chicks at a crossfit competition doing crossfit clean and jerks at crossfit sanitas in boulder, co
CrossFit Clean and Jerk

The more I do CrossFit, the more I realize the mental game is much more important than the physical game. Sure, you have to be in shape, but being in shape is an equalizer — the mental game is what will set you apart from others and allow you to win CrossFit competitions and just win your daily CrossFit WODs.

I woke up on Thursday with a plan to do CrossFit workouts that were simple but involved a barbell and burpees. No part of me wanted to do any of it. I was sore and just not feeling it. So, I didn’t. I just rowed and ran, a modified CrossFit Hero WOD Jerry, if you will. And I felt really good afterwards.

This was both a mental and a physical break. I could have done by planned CrossFit workout, but it would have sucked because my head wasn’t in the game. So why bother?

The Main Advantage to Doing Your Own CrossFit Programming

  • You can adjust your CrossFit programming to suit your needs. I adjust my CrossFit programming on a daily basis it seems. I get up and assess where I’m at. Towards the end of the week, I’m spent, and my CrossFit workouts often change. I believe this is the best part of doing your own CrossFit programming and of working out by yourself. Instead of constantly pushing and tweaking your body and pushing your mental game, you can take breaks. Breaks become especially important as you get older.

If you attend a CrossFit box, know when to take mental breaks from CrossFit. It’s okay to do a different workout than everyone else. It’s okay to let your mind rest, so you can attack the next workout. Doing your CrossFit workouts constantly half-heartedly is not going to benefit you in the long run. Breaks allow you to come back stronger and attack CrossFit workouts when you need to.

Can You Plateau with CrossFit?

As I’ve slowly watched my weight increase (and not in a good way) over the past 6 months, I’ve been wondering this question: Can you plateau with CrossFit? In my mind, yes, I believe you can and here’s why:

  • Same movements, same weights. Sure, CrossFit is known for its variety in workouts. However, it’s still all the same movements and usually the Rx (the recommended weights) are the same each go-around.
  • Same format. Each CrossFit box is unique, but most stick to the same pattern. At my old CrossFit box (of which I have just now switched), we did a strength and then a workout or WOD that was usually under 20 minutes. Well, your body adapts to this over time (for me it was 3 years), and unless you push yourself further, you won’t see results.
  • Same mindset. It’s hard to push yourself when working out alone. Yet, I’m still moving but am I getting the same benefits?
  • Same perspective. A change in coaches is a good thing. Listening to different ideas is a good thing. Visiting other boxes and seeing how others do things will prompt you to do things differently. Go somewhere else. Get a different opinion and different idea. Let go of the idea “this is how it’s always done” and be open.

CHANGES IN CROSSFIT PROGRAMMING

crossfit girls doing burpees over barbell at crossfit competition
Burpees over Barbell

As I said before, it’s time for a change. I’ve recently embraced HIIT training, which is training at high-intensity for short amounts of time with active recovery in-between. The theory goes HIIT training gets and keeps your heart rate up and burns more fat in less time, increasing your metabolism, which translates to more fat burn up to 48 hours after the workout. And this is what I need.

I want to improve my CrossFit game, and for the last 6 months, all I’ve been doing is maintaining. I’m adding in HIIT classes, swimming, and smaller does of CrossFit (sometimes twice a day) to see what happens. And when I do CrossFit, it will be different. Heavier weights. Odd objects. Something.

It takes something unusual to make me sore these days (this is part of the reason I love CrossFit Competitions so much — different exercises and multiple times in one day that make me sore). I miss that sore feeling — the knowledge in your brain you are changing instead of staying the same. And no one wants to stay the same.