crossfitmomm crossfit competition battle of the box utah

CrossFit Competition: Battle of the Box Utah

Last weekend, my daughter and I (my son tagged along as well) traveled to Lehi, Utah, for a CrossFit Competition. We were partners, and we entered Battle of the Box Utah in the intermediate division. It was fun. We got to swim in Salt Lake. We tried to see the largest open-pit mine in the world, Bingham Canyon Mine, but it was closed due to COVID.

We got to do pistols in the competition. Overall, it was an okay competition. Neither of us liked the second WOD, which had you doing burpees every minute on the minute while trying to complete an AMRAP.

It’s just nice to compete in CrossFit.

crossfitmomm at crossfit competition red white blue showcase kearny nebraska

CrossFit Competition: Red, White & Blue Showcase

Today, my daughter and I traveled to Kearney, NE, to do the Red, White & Blue Showcase, a CrossFit competition at Kearney CrossFit. It was fun. We had six workouts, and by the last one, we both almost died. We entered the scaled division for females because I’m a master’s athlete and she’s a teen. There were three divisions: RX, scaled, and intermediate.

What was frustrating about this CrossFit Competition is having to compete against women who entered the scaled and were really not scaled. They should have been in the intermediate — and their scores showed it when they beat most of the intermediate teams in the workouts. This part was exceedingly frustrating. Inevitably, at all CrossFit Competitions that I attend, there are always those teams who enter a lower division merely because they prioritize winning over competing at their own level. This is sad because you cheat those teams who are truly scaled out of podium contention, and these are the people who need that boost the most in order to stay motivated to keep working towards their goals.

To those teams, I urge you to think about others over yourselves, and not being able to do one movement out of dozens is truly not a reason to enter lower.

CrossFit competitions are about pushing yourself to be better; how are you better when you pounce those who you should not be competing against?

CrossFit Competition for Teens Denver

CrossFit: Why Your CrossFit Teen Program is NOT Growing…

Teenagers are a fickle bunch. They really don’t want to do anything unless it’s what they want to do (which is hang out with their friends and sit around all day long, watching Netflix, playing video games, or just reading a good book in bed). They are at that awkward age where they are trying to figure out themselves, what they want to do in this world, and why they exist. Heavy questions for only having on average about 15 years of experience.

CROSSFIT AND TEENS

Enter CrossFit. CrossFit began as a way to get in shape. Period. It would have been cool I think to have been there at its inception or to have participated in the first CrossFit Games where it was nothing but pure fun and a good time.

Fast-forward a decade, and CrossFit is a serious sport with professional athletes. While this is fun to watch, the vast majority of CrossFitters will never be at that level — and most don’t want to be.

However, the problem arises when this mentality of being the best, pushing yourself, and actually caring about WODs is thrusted upon teens, who, honestly, could give a shit most of the time. Granted, there are those serious about it; but, to be truthful, they have time, and most of them know that.

THE LOCAL CROSSFIT COMPETITION SCENE

I enter CrossFit competitions because they are fun. That is it. If I win, great. If I come in last place, great (I must admit, there have been CrossFit competitions where I have secretly hoped to come in last place so I could leave early).

As a parent, I want to share this with my daughter, who likes CrossFit, but at this point, just does it for fun (and to spend time with me, but she’d never admit that).

As someone who can never find a partner for whatever reason, she and I have become partners in several CrossFit competitions. We usually enter scaled so she can do the movements. In one that is coming up, we have entered Open, mainly because I thought this CrossFit competition had a scaled division (just found out it does not).

In local CrossFit competitions, the WOD’s are released as the CrossFit competition nears. This gives the die-hards time to practice (I never do cause I don’t give a shit), and it gives those who are on the fence about signing up an opportunity to decide.

Back to the whole point of this article: so this local competition is not programmed at all for teens. In fact, I will be doing the majority of the work. This is incredibly frustrating: 1) I would like to be able to walk the next day 2) my daughter does not get to experience the whole experience of the CrossFit competition when I’m doing the vast majority of the work. Plus, this is no fun for either of us.

PROGRAM CROSSFIT COMPETITIONS FOR TEENS!

But the real point of this CrossFit rant is that no CrossFit competition is programmed for teens (even when it’s a teen CrossFit competition). It’s programmed for 17 & 18 years olds who are a world away from 13, 14 & 15-year olds. As a parent, this is beyond frustrating. In fact, I’ve had several words with several CrossFit competitions (who all probably hate me, too) about this very fact. If you’re not even using CrossFit Open teen standards to program for teens, then there’s a problem.

I believe firmly this is why CrossFit teens programs at local CrossFit boxes remain stagnant. You cannot coach or program teens like you do adults. The focus needs to be in just getting teens to the gym, working out, and going home feeling like they did something. The passion will come later when they actually care.

My fight will continue as I am utterly incapable of not voicing my opinion. My prayer is that CrossFit does wise up, return to its roots, and just get teens moving (this is good advice for adults, too).

And programming a CrossFit competition with teens in mind would be nice. But so many CrossFit boxes are afraid if they don’t put on a good comp, no one will come back. I believe the opposite is true. When a CrossFit competition is all-inclusive, your CrossFit competition will grow (as will your membership). Contact me today!

CrossFit Competition CrossFit DNR hot crossfit chick Colorado

CrossFit Competitions: Two in One Weekend

I don’t normally do two CrossFit competitions in one weekend, but one came up that I did last year that I wanted to do again, and I had already signed up for a different one, so I did both.

The first one, Rocky Mountain Showdown at CrossFit DNR in Fort Collins was fun. We made it to the semi-finals, but it’s hard when you’re knocked out by a 19-year-old.

The second one, Battle at the Rock at CrossFit Castle Rock, I did last year. This year was just as fun. I came in third here.

Some highlights from this past weekend:

  • I ran a 7-minute mile flat. I haven’t done that in forever.
  • I clean and jerked 125 lb, the most I’ve done since my thumb injury.

As most of you know, I have been battling some type of injury most of this year. I still have my thumb injury that is taking forever to heal. Currently, I have a lung inflammation (at least that was what I was told last week). Now, I’m on meds for a lung infection. So I worked out all weekend sick.

Part of it is/was dumb.

But it makes me wonder what I can do if I’m ever 100% well again.

The Pitfalls of Local CrossFit Competitions

I’ve done at least two dozen local CrossFit competitions, and usually in each one, there are some of the same pitfalls:

  • Unfair judging. With local competitions, you get judges who are graciously volunteering their time, but most of them have no experience judging CrossFit competitions and thus make mistakes. This ends up affecting the podium, and I have lost several times because of this.
  • Inconsistent judging. Again, due to lack of experience, athletes are not held to the same standards. Even though everyone knows the standards for a burpee, some competitors will cheat if they can get away with it — and a lot of the time, they do. No one likes to be the bad guy and “no rep” others. Hence, some athletes cheat themselves to the detriment of others who play by the rules, who have integrity, and who want to win fairly. I see this a lot, which is honestly, sad.
  • Improper equipment. Having to deadlift with a guy’s bar 20 kilos as opposed to 15 kilos) when you’re not used to it is a disadvantage to women whose bars are thinner and weigh less. When you’re outside in the blazing sun at 90 degrees and you’re trying to grip a guy bar and your hands are sweaty, it’s tough.
  • Unbalance programming. Due to time constraints, most of the CrossFit workouts are short. This plays to those who are sprinters and not to marathoners. Furthermore, the CrossFit programming is at the whim of the host box and is sometimes inconsistent as well. For example, one CrossFit competition I attended had no gymnastics work at all (pull ups, double unders, muscles ups, handstand push ups, etc). This is a separator for athletes and puts those who have these moves at an advantage. Same goes for one I attended that was all heavy bar work. That puts those who are strong at a disadvantage to those who are agile. Ideally, there should be balance in the CrossFit workouts at CrossFit Competitions.

    hotcrossfitchicks at local crossfit competitions in denver, co
    Local CrossFit Competitions
  • Poor management/getting off schedule. There have been some local CrossFit competitions where the CrossFit competition has run way off schedule and ended up finishing an hour or more behind — which sucks when you got at least an hour drive home ahead of you.

TIPS FOR BETTER CROSSFIT COMPETITIONS

  • Balanced programming. Workouts don’t need to be complicated, but they should challenge the athletes and test them across the ten CrossFit fitness domains.
  • Invest the time in finding good CrossFit judges. Ideally, you’ll want your judges to have taken the CrossFit Judges course. If not, to have at least some experience in judging CrossFit competitions. This eliminates disgruntled athletes who may be disinclined to attend your next CrossFit competition because they feel cheated at yours.
  • Adhere to your schedule. Hiccups happen out of your control the day of the CrossFit competition. However, you can plan ahead to minimize these as much as possible and stay on schedule. Make sure heats are not too close together to wear athletes out. Test your workouts with members of your gym of all fitness levels to figure out how much time you’ll need to complete them.  Consider recovery time, set up time, time for awards, and time for lunch as well.
  • Have the proper equipment. This doesn’t mean you go out and buy all brand new sandbags for your CrossFit competition. It does mean you borrow what you need from another local box or you program to what you have on hand. Trying to jerry-rig something from nothing will only give you poor impressions and a high likelihood no one will return the following year.

From an athlete’s perspective, I’ll return the following year to one with good programming, one that’s run efficiently, and one with at least judges who do CrossFit. I’ll stay clear of the ones where lackadaisical attitude toward the CrossFit competition by the box ruled.

CrossFit: Mental Fortitude Day

crossfit girls rowing at crossfit sanitas in boulder, co
Rowing at CrossFit Sanitas, Boulder, CO

Sitting on a rower for 30 minutes is not exactly easy.

After 20 minutes, you’ve had enough.

After 25 minutes, you’re about to scream.

After 28 minutes, you convert minutes to seconds and just keep going.

Then try 10 minutes on the bike right afterwards.

I strained a muscle in my right arm again, so I’ve been doing no heavy weight. Today, I decided to row for 30 minutes and bike for 10 minutes for active recovery and because I felt like doing nothing else at the end of a long (and frustrating) week.

It’s been a while since I’ve done a 30 minute row. And, afterwards, I remember why.

Still, it strengthened my mental fortitude — something I need in CrossFit right now with the CrossFit Open right around the corner.

What CrossFit Moves Are in Your Wheelhouse?

I never realized the importance of having moves you dominate in CrossFit until my last competition. Called in your wheelhouse, these CrossFit moves are vital to winning workouts and, if you compete, to competitions.

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CrossFit Pull Ups

CrossFit moves in your wheelhouse are moves you dominate every time they show up in a workout — moves you are really, really good at. I made up time in my CrossFit competition when one showed up in one workout, and I won the event where both moves were in my wheelhouse.

In CrossFit, advice is often given on how you need to focus on the moves you’re bad at, so you improve those. This is true. However, you need to make sure you don’t forget NOT to practice the moves in your wheelhouse, so you don’t lose those in sacrifice to others.

The fact of the matter is: you will improve those moves you’re not so good at, but they will never be like the ones you’re naturally good at, the ones you like, the ones you dominate.

CrossFit Moves in My Wheelhouse

  • Assault bike
  • Double unders
  • Rope climbs
  • Running
  • Thrusters
  • Burpees

As you can see, I’m not very good at most CrossFit moves. But these ones are popular and when thrown into a CrossFit WOD can make all the difference whether you win or lose.

CrossFit is constantly-varied, functional movements at high-intensity. Every CrossFit workout you do, you’ll get better. Know what you’re good at and add to them if possible — all the while improving all the other CrossFit movements. This is the key to winning at your box, in your heat, in your mind, and at CrossFit competitions. Good luck!

Being Physically Exhausted from a CrossFit Competition

Last night, I went to bed at 6:30 pm. I was physically exhausted — something I am definitely not used to.

After a 2-day CrossFit Competition, and I worked out yesterday morning with no rest day (I squatted and did a workout with a run, hang power snatches, and burpee box jumps), I was dragging all day at work and when I came home, I was tired. I couldn’t even eat dinner. I just went straight to bed.

CrossFit Competitions will wear you out — emotionally and physically. You want to do your best, you’re disappointed when you don’t do your best, you stress over the details like the drive down and when to eat, and then there’s the actual workouts themselves, which are bears to get through.

The Importance of Sleep after a CrossFit Competition

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Preparing for CrossFit Workout

All of this equals exhaustion. When this happens, listen to your body and get some rest. Sleep is so important with CrossFit to let your body heal, recover, and rejuvenate. Here’s my advice after a CrossFit competition or some other grueling workout, such as a Tough Mudder or Spartan Race:

  • Get extra sleep. This will allow vital tissues and muscles to recover and recuperate after what you’ve just put them through.
  • Drink more than you think you’ll need. I usually lose about 4 pounds every CrossFit competition. Most of this is water weight. At a CrossFit competition, you usually don’t drink much because you don’t want to have to go to the bathroom, you forget, or you’re just too nervous. Afterwards, you need to replenish. Drink extra water and recovery drinks for optimal muscle recovery.
  • Take rest days. I’m a hypocrite. I don’t do this. I don’t like to get behind on my training. Yet, you usually suffer if you don’t (or you’re so tired you lose a whole night!). Give your body some well-deserved time off.
  • Take inventory of what you’ve learned. I learned a lot from this last CrossFit competition. I learned once again I’m stronger than I think I am when I flipped a 300 pound tire multiple times. I learned I need to practice on a bar that I can’t touch the ground on. I learned I can still kick ass when the I have to, especially if the moves are in my wheelhouse. I learned I still have the fire to compete that I thought I had lost from burn-out. I learned I’m just as good as others, if not better.

The whole point of CrossFit competitions is to learn from them, push yourself, and be proud of your achievement. You probably won’t win them all. But within each competition, there will be a personal victory — either a move you did you didn’t think you could do or a workout you annihilated.

Keep in mind why you compete in CrossFit, and you’ll just keep getting better and better.

CrossFit Competitions: Turkey Challenge Day 2

Hot CrossFit Chicks sandbag run crossfit Competitions
Sandbag Run at CrossFit Competition

Two-day CrossFit Competitions are rough: You’re tired from Day 1 and you have another tough day ahead of you.

Day 2 of the Turkey Challenge began with a “Burden Run,” and, yes, it is just what you think it is.

Wearing a 10 pound weight vest, you had to run with a 60 pound sandbag on your back for 150 meters, do 10 back squats with the bag, 6 lateral burpees over the bar, and then do max calories on the rower. 5 rounds. 2:30 minutes each. 30 seconds rest in-between.

I actually did really well on this one, except once I couldn’t get the bag up. But I got 4th place.

I did 7 tire flips with a 300 pound tire (never done that before).

AND I won my final WOD: 10 rounds of 15 double unders and 1 rope climb.

Overall, a great day. It boosted my confidence after the first day and has got me wanting more. After I take a break and get my tooth fixed.

Lessons Learned from 2-Day CrossFit Competitions

CrossFit Babes double unders Crossfit Competition
Double Unders at CrossFit Competition
  • You get to do exercises you otherwise don’t: sandbag runs with a weight vest and tire flips.
  • I’m stronger than I think I am. I did 300 pound tire flips — 7 of them — and I didn’t think I could do one.

Overall, a great competition. Fun to watch. Learned a lot. Got remotivated for CrossFit. Good, albeit long, weekend!

 

CrossFit Competitions: Turkey Challenge Day 1

hot crossfit women at crossfit competition
Running CrossFit Competition

On a snowy day in Colorado, today was Day 1 of the 2018 Turkey Challenge in Superior, CO, at the Sport Stable arena. I competed in the Masters competition and my daughter competed in the Teens Division.

I could have done better but tomorrow is Day 2, and I’m hoping to improve.  I definitely need a break as I’m feeling burnt out on CrossFit competitions, and it’s showing.

It was fun to do with my daughter (this is her first CrossFit competition). It’s a popular one in Colorado, so it was packed.  Lots of vendors, lots of excitement, and Matt Chan. What more could one ask for?

Matt Chan
Matt Chan at Turkey Challenge Crossfit Competition

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Tips for Multi-Day CrossFit Competitions

  • Pace yourself. Two days is a lot, and you want to save some in the tank for Day 2 of the CrossFit Competition.
  • Realize there are people better than you. I win some CrossFit competitions, but I lose many as well. It all depends on who shows up, and if the workouts play to your strengths.
  • Bring lots of food, water, and energy drinks. You’ll be hungrier than you think you’ll be.
  • Show up early to find out where the workouts will be held. With such a big venue, it’s easy to get lost. Take the stress out of your CrossFit competition, and be early to find your way around.
Teen crossfit girls at crossfit competition
Teen Crossfit Competition
crossfit babes at crossfit competiton
Snatches at CrossFit Competition