CrossFit Open Workout 19.1

hotcrossfitchicks doing crossfit open workout 19.1 in Colorado with wall balls and rowing
CrossFit Open Workout 19.1

CrossFit Open Workout 19.1 is:

AMRAP 15:

  • 19 wall balls
  • 19 cal row

As much as I didn’t like this workout, it played to one of my strengths: stamina.  I did well. I was happy with my score. I exceeded my goal. That’s all that matters.

What will CrossFit Open Workout 19.2 be? Give me a barbell or dumbbells. I do believe since this one was all lower body, we’ll see something upper body. Either heavy push jerks, pull ups, or muscle ups even.

 

CrossFit: Deadlifts and DT

CrossFit hotties doing Push Jerks at CrossFit competition
CrossFit Push Jerks

DT is a hero Workout by CrossFit that honors soldiers who have given their lives for this great nation. DT is also known as one of the hardest CrossFit workouts since it involves heavy weights.

CROSSFIT DT HERO WOD:

5 Rounds for time:

  • 12 deadlifts
  • 9 hang power cleans
  • 6 push jerks

Weight is 155 lb for guys and 105 for the ladies.

I PR’ed this workout (hit a personal record) by 2 minutes — only the 2nd time I’ve been strong enough to do 105 lbs. It was good, but it probably could have been better. I will add this one to my list of tests to do periodically. I like DT because it does challenge me as heavy weights is not my strong suit.

I also got some nice bruises when the hang power cleans got a bit too heavy!

I also did deadlifts for my strength since DT has deadlifts in them. It was a good combination to start off the week!

Can You Plateau with CrossFit?

As I’ve slowly watched my weight increase (and not in a good way) over the past 6 months, I’ve been wondering this question: Can you plateau with CrossFit? In my mind, yes, I believe you can and here’s why:

  • Same movements, same weights. Sure, CrossFit is known for its variety in workouts. However, it’s still all the same movements and usually the Rx (the recommended weights) are the same each go-around.
  • Same format. Each CrossFit box is unique, but most stick to the same pattern. At my old CrossFit box (of which I have just now switched), we did a strength and then a workout or WOD that was usually under 20 minutes. Well, your body adapts to this over time (for me it was 3 years), and unless you push yourself further, you won’t see results.
  • Same mindset. It’s hard to push yourself when working out alone. Yet, I’m still moving but am I getting the same benefits?
  • Same perspective. A change in coaches is a good thing. Listening to different ideas is a good thing. Visiting other boxes and seeing how others do things will prompt you to do things differently. Go somewhere else. Get a different opinion and different idea. Let go of the idea “this is how it’s always done” and be open.

CHANGES IN CROSSFIT PROGRAMMING

crossfit girls doing burpees over barbell at crossfit competition
Burpees over Barbell

As I said before, it’s time for a change. I’ve recently embraced HIIT training, which is training at high-intensity for short amounts of time with active recovery in-between. The theory goes HIIT training gets and keeps your heart rate up and burns more fat in less time, increasing your metabolism, which translates to more fat burn up to 48 hours after the workout. And this is what I need.

I want to improve my CrossFit game, and for the last 6 months, all I’ve been doing is maintaining. I’m adding in HIIT classes, swimming, and smaller does of CrossFit (sometimes twice a day) to see what happens. And when I do CrossFit, it will be different. Heavier weights. Odd objects. Something.

It takes something unusual to make me sore these days (this is part of the reason I love CrossFit Competitions so much — different exercises and multiple times in one day that make me sore). I miss that sore feeling — the knowledge in your brain you are changing instead of staying the same. And no one wants to stay the same.

 

“I’m Afraid of CrossFit”

This was the response I got from a young lady who works at a popular fitness center near me. I should have asked her why, but it’s the New Year, and all fitness centers are popular.

Still, I couldn’t help but wonder why? Why would you be afraid of CrossFit?

Why Some are Afraid of CrossFit

  • Getting hurt. This is the most common reason people are afraid of CrossFit. This
    crossfit girls doing chest to bar pull ups at crossfit competition
    CrossFit Chest to Bar Pull Ups

    one baffles me. Sure, you can get injured, don’t get me wrong. But the injury rate of CrossFit is much less than all other sports, especially repetitive movement sports such as running, baseball, basketball, or hockey. This is where a high-quality CrossFit coach will keep you safe, prevent you from doing moves your shouldn’t, and correct your form when needed.

  • Intimidating. The CrossFit equipment is foreign and the members look foreign as well with fit, muscular bodies.  A CrossFit box is no more intimidating than walking into a gym with all the foreign weight machines or taking a group fitness class with different lingos or even yoga with its own language. Furthermore, most people who do CrossFit do not look like Mat Fraser or Annie Thorisdottir. They are average people who look like most others.
  • Humbling. This is true especially for guys. You won’t be the quickest in the CrossFit box when you do CrossFit for the first time. You won’t be able to do all the moves. And you won’t be able to RX (perform the CrossFit workout with the recommended weight loads) for quite a while. This is why CrossFit is so addicting. You push yourself beyond your comfort zone until you change. In fact, that’s the only way you will change.
  • Misconceptions. CrossFit is not what you see at the CrossFit Games, which, for most people, is all they know of CrossFit. There are so many misconceptions and misconstrued assumptions of CrossFit that are wrong floating around; however, a lot of people believe these untruths. The only way to know for sure is to try CrossFit out.

Fear is the universal reaction we all have when we are ignorant of something. You were afraid to ride your bike for the first time, afraid to go to school, afraid to go to college, and afraid at your first job interview. You were afraid to ask your now spouse out, afraid of rejection, and afraid of travelling abroad. But once you did it, your fear fled like a cat who hears a loud noise.

The fear of CrossFit is the same as the fear of any sport or any gym you want to join. Once you get used to CrossFit, you might enjoy it. But you’ll never know unless you try.

Life is too short to live in fear of anything.

Just do it. You’ll be glad you did.

The After Effects of CrossFit Hero WOD Chad Wilkinson

namesake photoChad Wilkinson died in October by suicide after 22 years serving our country. A new CrossFit Hero WOD has been created, honoring him. The CrossFit workout is 1000 step ups wearing a ruck sack for time. As you may recall, I did this on Friday.

It is now 48 hours later, and I’m still suffering the consequences. Yesterday, I didn’t think it was too bad — just a slight ache in my calves. Today, my calves are both sore, putting a hitch in my step. As I’m on vacation, I can’t put anything on them, so here I am, suffering.

During the CrossFit Hero WOD, I kept telling myself, “I’m never doing this one again.” Afterwards, I told myself, “I could do that again.” Now, I’m unsure. We’ll see how long the pain lasts on this one.

CrossFit: Doing Things Others Won’t Smartly

This morning I did a new CrossFit Hero Workout called Chad Wilkinson. Honoring Chad

hot crossfit chicks doing step ups
Box Step Ups CrossFit

Wilkinson who died in October by suicide after 22 years serving our country, this Hero WOD is 1000 step ups wearing a ruck sack.

For me, the plan was to do 500. I kept going after 500 but stopped at 740 because my knee began to hurt. I had planned to do the 1000, but I listened to my body instead.

Our bodies are amazing and will do amazing things. At the same time, we have to care for our bodies, and we are called to honor our bodies (1 Corinthians 6:19-20).

I currently am battling a strain in my right arm, and I don’t need a knee injury right now.

Oh, how I’ve changed. One year ago, I would have pushed through to finish that, no matter the cost. Now, as I’m older (and wiser), I know it’s just not worth it.

I love doing things others won’t do; yet, now, I’m doing them smartly.

Tips to Know When to Quit

  • When something begins to hurt
  • When something feels off
  • When your mind is not focused, and you’re putting yourself at an increased risk for injury
  • When your gut tells you so
  • When you’re mentally done

 

Knowing When to Rest From CrossFit

Ever since Sunday, I’ve been hitting my CrossFit workouts hard. This week has been all about heavy weights, which I haven’t done for a while, especially after coming back from surgery. My shoulders are trashed. My calves are trashed. Squatting down in the simple things like doing laundry is difficult.

This morning I had a workout planned. I did not do it. I was too sore, and my body was crying out for rest.  Here’s some tips on how to know when to rest from exercise, CrossFit workouts, running, or whatever sport you do.

Tips to Know When to Rest from Exercise

  • Your body is crying out to you. This one should be intuitive, but I often ignore this one. When everything is sore and everyday movements become a challenge, it’s time for a break.
  • Your exhausted at the end of the day. Exercise causes trauma to our bodies that our bodies need rest and sleep in order to recover from. If you’re not giving your body rest, then you are not maximizing your time under the barbell. When you’re tired all the time, it’s your body crying out to rest, so it can do its job and repair muscle fibers and tissues, so you can be stronger for your next CrossFit workout.
  • Your mental game is affected. Loss of enthusiasm, motivation, and desire is a sure sign you need a rest day. If you’re only half into your CrossFit workout and you’re just going through the movements without any heart, then you’re not doing yourself any good. Rest and hit your workouts hard in the upcoming days.
  • You have a tweak that won’t go away. If you exercise or do CrossFit a lot, odds are you’re familiar with tweaks — some muscle feels a bit off and when you move it, you notice it. Most of the time, these tweaks resolve themselves on their own in a week or so. However, if you have a perpetual tweak that won’t go away, it’s time for a break. Take at least one rest day and then rest that muscle as much as possible. Modify the CrossFit programming to suit your needs or design your own CrossFit programming.
crossfit babes taking a rest day
Rest Day in CrossFit

As you can see, the key is listening to your body. Rest is crucial to progress in sports, but it’s so hard to take that day when our passion is our sport. Below are tips for rest days.

Tips for Rest Days

  • Active recovery. It’s hard for some of us to not do anything physical on rest days. Active recovery is a great way to let your muscles recover but appease your mind that is nagging at you to work out. I personally like to walk my dog on rest days from CrossFit or go swimming, which is no impact and gets all your built-up lactic acid in your muscles.
  • Distraction. Plan rest days during the week instead of on weekends, so you’re busy all day long. Plan rest days during the weekend if your weekend is packed, and you won’t have time to exercise.
  • Plan your CrossFit programming or workouts. Planning my next workouts satisfies the need deep within me to workout. It gives me something to look forward to when it’s time to hit my CrossFit workouts hard again.
  • Read a book. Alternate worlds are always good to enter when trying to NOT do something like exercise.
  • Get a massage. Let’s face it, we all need massages if we lift heavy weights. Schedule your massage during your rest day if possible to maximize the effects of rest on the body.
  • Go to bed early that day. Get extra sleep to afford your body the time it needs to repair muscle tissue and grow stronger.

We only get stronger when we rest. Adequate rest and nutrition play a big part in our muscle gains and, odd enough, our muscle loss.

Working out and lifting heavy weights, whether you do CrossFit or a different sport, is only half the equation. Keep in mind the harder part — eating right and resting — and you’ll see results quicker.