When a CrossFit Hero Workout Hits the Spot

I was on vacation this weekend and CrossFit Open workout 19.2 wasn’t really a workout when I didn’t make it past the first round, so I was itching for something long and hard. Enter Andy, a CrossFit Hero workout, named for U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Andrew T. Weathers who died Sept. 30, 2014.

Weathers was wounded Sept. 28 in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, when he heroically ran to a rooftop through hundreds of incoming rounds to repel an attack of insurgents who were attempting to overrun his position. His actions saved the lives of five U.S. Green Berets and nine Afghan Commandos at his location. Weathers was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 7th Special Forces Group, at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida.

 

His CrossFit Hero workout is:

  • 25 thrusters
  • 50 box jumps
  • 75 deadlifts
  • 1.5 mile run
  • 75 deadlifts
  • 50 box jumps
  • 25 thrusters

80 pounds on the bar for women and wearing a weight vest (14 lb for women).

I did really well at this workout. I came in way under the 1 hour I thought it would take me, and it was fun. It was just what I needed on this negative degree morning in Colorado. It gave me motivation and encouragement because when I woke up I didn’t want to do it. Long workouts are one of my strengths, and I sweated and this CrossFit Hero WOD was hard. and it was awesome.

I love CrossFit.

CrossFit: Knowing When to Take a Mental Break from CrossFit

hot crossfit chicks at a crossfit competition doing crossfit clean and jerks at crossfit sanitas in boulder, co
CrossFit Clean and Jerk

The more I do CrossFit, the more I realize the mental game is much more important than the physical game. Sure, you have to be in shape, but being in shape is an equalizer — the mental game is what will set you apart from others and allow you to win CrossFit competitions and just win your daily CrossFit WODs.

I woke up on Thursday with a plan to do CrossFit workouts that were simple but involved a barbell and burpees. No part of me wanted to do any of it. I was sore and just not feeling it. So, I didn’t. I just rowed and ran, a modified CrossFit Hero WOD Jerry, if you will. And I felt really good afterwards.

This was both a mental and a physical break. I could have done by planned CrossFit workout, but it would have sucked because my head wasn’t in the game. So why bother?

The Main Advantage to Doing Your Own CrossFit Programming

  • You can adjust your CrossFit programming to suit your needs. I adjust my CrossFit programming on a daily basis it seems. I get up and assess where I’m at. Towards the end of the week, I’m spent, and my CrossFit workouts often change. I believe this is the best part of doing your own CrossFit programming and of working out by yourself. Instead of constantly pushing and tweaking your body and pushing your mental game, you can take breaks. Breaks become especially important as you get older.

If you attend a CrossFit box, know when to take mental breaks from CrossFit. It’s okay to do a different workout than everyone else. It’s okay to let your mind rest, so you can attack the next workout. Doing your CrossFit workouts constantly half-heartedly is not going to benefit you in the long run. Breaks allow you to come back stronger and attack CrossFit workouts when you need to.

Crossfit Open Workout 19.2

Workout 19.2 features squat cleans ... a lot of them. Photo: CrossFit GamesCrossFit Open Workout 19.2 was a repeat of CrossFit Open Workout 16.2. It is:

  • 25 toes to bar
  • 50 double unders
  • 15 squat cleans (85 lbs)
  • 25 toes to bar
  • 50 double unders
  • 13 squat cleans (115)

If you finish in under 8 minutes, you get 4 more minutes to do another round with heavier squat clean weight.

I didn’t finish this round, but I was happy with it. I almost did.

After 2 weeks of CrossFit Open workouts for 2019, I’m just not into it. Without Regionals to measure yourself against, you’re against everyone, and being in the thousands tells me nothing of my fitness level. The CrossFit Open used to be a way to measure your improvement over a year. Now, the only way you know if you’ve improved is in your head. Can you do a muscle up this year that you couldn’t last year? Can you string more double unders together? Can you lift heavier weight?

The CrossFit Open to me is not what it used to be. And that saddens me.

Mental Break in CrossFit Hero’s WOD Bradley

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Bradley R. Smith, 24, of Troy, Illinois, was killed on January 3, 2010, by an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan.

His CrossFit Hero WOD is:

10 rounds for time of:

  • Sprint 100 meters
  • 10 Pull-ups
  • Sprint 100 meters
  • 10 Burpees
  • Rest 30 seconds

There’s nothing quite like CrossFit body weight workouts. They don’t require as much concentration as workouts with a barbell or even dumbbells. They are usually just mindless grinder once you get going.

Which was the CrossFit workout I needed this day.

Uneven Load Training: Underestimating Sandbag Sit-ups

CrossFit Babe doing wall balls in CrossFit Open 19.1
Perfect Wall Ball position in CrossFit

Today was a sandbag workout.

I decided to sub 30 v-ups for 30 sandbag sit-ups, mainly because I like sandbag sit ups.

Well, this was a mistake.

They were a lot harder than I thought and 30 of them about killed me. But it was good.

Lesson learned: subbing sandbags for other movements may not be such a good idea after all.

CrossFit Open Workout 19.1

hotcrossfitchicks doing crossfit open workout 19.1 in Colorado with wall balls and rowing
CrossFit Open Workout 19.1

CrossFit Open Workout 19.1 is:

AMRAP 15:

  • 19 wall balls
  • 19 cal row

As much as I didn’t like this workout, it played to one of my strengths: stamina.  I did well. I was happy with my score. I exceeded my goal. That’s all that matters.

What will CrossFit Open Workout 19.2 be? Give me a barbell or dumbbells. I do believe since this one was all lower body, we’ll see something upper body. Either heavy push jerks, pull ups, or muscle ups even.

 

How the Extreme Cold is Good for the Heart, Soul, and Mind

It’s winter, but winter on the Front Range in Colorado never truly feels like winter. You see, we’re spoiled here. It snows, but usually melts the next day. Ice doesn’t stay around long (ice storms are virtually unheard of here). The winter temperatures hover in the 40s usually.

This week it’s been cold — bitter cold. Negative degree temperatures at night. Single degree temperatures in the day.

So cold that picking up my CrossFit barbell in my insulated garage (useless in this cold of weather) gives me shudders. I don’t want to go anywhere. I don’t want to do anything. I just want to stay home with a cup of coffee (still waiting for Starbucks to figure out delivery), a cat on my lap, and a book in my hand.

WHAT I’VE LEARNED FROM THE EXTREME COLD

  • The extreme cold prevents me from going over and above my normal exercise routine. I can’t go for an afternoon jog. Going to a HIIT workout class at night is out of the question. Spending prolonged periods in my garage is out of the question.
  • My life revolves around outdoor activities. Sitting around on a Friday night, asking the kids what they want to do this weekend, has led me to this conclusion. Everything I came up with (bike rides, hikes, swimming, visiting cool places) involved sunny weather. I like being outdoors, enjoying nature, and exploring. The extreme cold prevents all of this.Image result for icicles

BENEFITS OF THE EXTREME COLD

  • I spend less money. Not leaving my home (despite the ubiquitous internet) means I spend less money.
  • I get valuable rest time I need. I am always at risk of overtraining since I find it hard to limit myself when it comes to exercising and CrossFit. Having a cold garage and icy roads keeps me from exercising. And I also get to sleep in, which I desperately need since I never get enough sleep.
  • I spend more time with my kids, hanging out doing nothing. This cannot be overemphasized, especially if you have teenagers. Getting them to talk about their days, their feelings, and their social interactions can be tough, but when you’re stuck at home on an ice, cold day, playing UNO or coloring, the conversations flows.
  • I have time to reflect. Most of our lives are pretty busy. Running kids around, work, play, exercise, and social functions in addition to household jobs such as cleaning, cooking, and sleeping, take up most of our days. When I’m not on-the-go, I can reflect more on where I’m heading in this world and where I want to go — and pivot if I need to.
  • I read more. This is probably a no-brainer but worth mentioning. When you’re stuck at home, more books that have been lying around the house get read.

As much as the extreme cold temperatures suck, take advantage of the downtime. Do those projects you’ve been meaning to do around the house. Spend time with your kids. Watch a movie together on Netflix or Amazon Prime. And rest up. Cause soon enough it will be go time once again!